Screening for Depression

The past couple of years has been challenging.  So as we look toward the future, we encourage you to make your mental health a priority. Mental illnesses are real, common, and treatable.

Depression is one of the most common mental health diagnoses detected early from mental health screenings. Everyone feels sad at times, but depression is different than normal sadness or grief. Depression is a mental health condition that can affect how you think, feel, and behave, making it hard to function at home and work.

Utilizing an online screening tool is one of the quickest and easiest ways to determine whether you are experiencing symptoms of a mental illness.  This self-assessment tool can help with early identification and encourages early intervention.  The screening is private, anonymous, quick, and accessible.  You can click here to take our free, completely anonymous, and confidential online depression self-assessment.

Mental health screenings play a crucial role in preventative care and overall well-being.  Additional Mental Health Screenings can be found by visiting Mental Health America. Don’t wait to find help with your mental health near you.

Life Management Center is here for you if you suspect you or someone you love may be experiencing depression. We offer crisis intervention, psychiatric care, and counseling services. You don’t have to suffer alone. Call (850) 522-4485 today to learn more about our services and schedule an appointment.

For mental health emergencies, help is available 24/7: Call 1-850-522-4485 and select option 5.

This assessment is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions.

This content provides information and discussion about mental health related subjects. The content provided and any linked material is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

What is Depression?

Everyone gets down from time to time, but feelings of sadness that last two or more weeks may be a sign of depression (Take our free, completely confidential online depression assessment).  Depression causes persistent feelings of sadness and loss of interest.  It affects how you feel, think and behave.  It is a mental health condition that significantly impacts normal day-to-day activities and can lead to serious emotional and physical problems.

Depression affects more than 16 million American adults each year, yet only about a third of those suffering from severe depression seek treatment from a mental health professional. Too many people resist treatment because they believe depression isn’t serious, and that they can treat it themselves or don’t consider it a medical illness. [1]

What are the signs and symptoms of depression?

Common symptoms include:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Loss of pleasure or interest in hobbies or activities
  • Changes in appetite or unplanned weight changes (weight gain or weight loss)
  • Angry outbursts, feelings of irritability, frustration, or restlessness
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering things, or making decisions
  • Loss of energy, fatigue, or being “slowed down”
  • Difficulty sleeping, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
  • Unexplained physical symptoms that do not ease with treatment
  • Suicide attempts or thoughts of death or suicide

Depression is more than just a case of the blues.  It isn’t something you can just “snap out” of.   However, depression is very treatable.  Treatments include lifestyle changes, support groups, medications, and therapy. People can recover from depression and live long and healthy lives, so don’t wait to find mental health near you.

Life Management Center is here for you if you suspect you or someone you love may be experiencing depression. We offer crisis intervention, psychiatric care, and counseling services. You don’t have to suffer alone. Call (850) 522-4485 today to learn more about our services and schedule an appointment.

For mental health emergencies help is available 24/7: Call 1-850-522-4485 and select option 5.

This content provides information and discussion about mental health-related subjects. The content provided and any linked material is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Source: Mental Health America, The Mayo Clinic

[1] Mental Health America

New Year’s Goals

Every year millions of people make New Year’s resolutions to spark a positive change in their lives. Typically, these resolutions involve improving your health, fitness, finances, or relationships.

Despite having the best of intentions, many people struggle to achieve their resolutions. According to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology, only 46% of people who made New Year’s resolutions were successful. So, in order to help you realize your New Year’s resolutions, we want to offer a few tips to encourage you as we head into 2022.

Set Goals, Not Resolutions. Invest some time in thoughtful reflection before setting your goals, and determine where you are and where you want to go. Reflect on the high and low points, but don’t stress out over them. Use this time of self-reflection to help you move forward to create your goals. Don’t get stuck on the negative things that happened. If you find you are stuck, talk to someone who can help you move forward.

Goals are the object of your ambition or effort; they are personal. If your goals have no meaning, you’re unlikely to achieve them.

Start Small. A lot of us tend to be too eager when it comes to resolutions, we have the best of intentions but take on a goal that is too big to achieve. So, this year as you set your goal make sure to start small, and divide a big goal into smaller goals that are more achievable.

Set Reasonable Goals with Realistic Expectations. Set reasonable, attainable goals throughout the year instead of one lofty goal on January 1. This can help you reach whatever it is you strive for and leads to a greater chance that you will keep them throughout the year. When setting your goals, step back and ask yourself if they’re realistic, if not, alter them to be more attainable. If you set your expectations too high, you may be setting yourself up for disappointment.

Change One Behavior at a Time. Unhealthy behaviors develop over the course of time so changing those behaviors into healthy ones requires time. Don’t get overwhelmed and think that you have to reassess everything in your life. Instead, work toward changing one thing at a time.

Ask for Support. Having a solid support system can help you stay motivated and accountable. Tell 3 people you trust and who encourage you. Explain what your goals are and ask them to help you to achieve your objectives.  You could also consider joining a support group such as a workout class at your gym or a group of coworkers quitting smoking or losing weight. Having someone to share your struggles and successes with you will make your journey to a healthier lifestyle much easier and less intimidating.

It’s important to remember that the New Year isn’t meant to be a catalyst for sweeping character changes. It is a time to reflect on past behavior and promise to make positive lifestyle changes. So, as you set your New Year’s goals, we want to remind you that Life Management Center is ready to help you with family support services, mental health treatment, crisis counseling, adoption services, and more. Contact us today at (850) 522-4485 to see how LMC can be a part of your 2022!

 

 

Hope for the Holidays: Holiday Mental Health Tips

The holidays can be a joy-filled season, but they can also be stressful. Stress and depression can not only ruin the holidays, but can be harmful to your physical and mental health as well. Having realistic expectations, planning ahead, and asking for help can reduce stress and depression.

Here are some suggestions for how you can reduce stress and maintain good mental health during the holiday season:

Acknowledge your Feelings & Accept your needs.

Be kind to yourself and put your own mental and physical well-being first. It’s ok to take time and express your feelings. Know what your triggers are to help you prepare for stressful situations, once you know this, you can take steps to avoid or cope with stress.

Manage your time and don’t try to do too much.

Prioritizing your time and activities can help you use your time well. Making a schedule helps ensure you don’t feel overwhelmed by tasks and deadlines. It’s okay to say no to plans that don’t fit into your schedule or make you feel good.

Be realistic.

As families change and grow, traditions often change as well. Choose a few to hold on to, and be open to creating new ones. Sometimes, it’s simply not possible to find the perfect gift or have a peaceful time with family. Family dynamics can be complex. Acknowledge them and accept that you can only control your role. Try to accept family members, friends, and the holidays as they are, even if they don’t live up to all of your expectations.

Don’t Abandon Healthy Practices.

Don’t let the holidays become a free-for-all. Not taking care of yourself and overindulgence will only add to your stress. Try these suggestions:

  • Exercise daily. Schedule time to take a walk or bike ride. Whatever you do, make sure it’s fun. Daily exercise improves your overall physical health.
  • Set aside time for yourself. Make time for activities that recharge you such as reading a book, watching a movie, or listening to your favorite music. It’s okay to prioritize alone time.
  • Eat well. With dinners, parties, and cookie trays at every turn, our eating habits are challenged during the holiday season. Try to maintain a healthy diet through it all.
  • Get enough sleep. Symptoms of some mental health conditions can be triggered and exacerbated by getting too little sleep.
  • Avoid alcohol and drugs. They don’t actually reduce stress: in fact, they often worsen it. If you’re struggling with substance abuse, educate yourself and get help.

Find support. 

Despite your best efforts, you may find yourself feeling persistently sad or anxious this holiday season. If these feelings last for a while, talk to your doctor or a mental health professional.

Take control of the holidays and don’t let them become something you dread. Take steps to prevent the stress and depression and learn to recognize your holiday triggers. With self-reflection, planning and positive thinking, you can find peace and joy during the holidays.

Life Management Center is here for you if you suspect you or someone you love may be experiencing depression. We offer crisis intervention, psychiatric care with outstanding physicians, and counseling services. You don’t have to suffer alone. Call (850) 522-4485 today to learn more about our services and schedule an appointment.

For mental health emergencies help is available 24-7. Life Management Center Call 850-522-4485 Option 5.

This content provides information and discussion about mental health-related subjects. The content provided and any linked material is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

 

Source:  Mental Health America; The Mayo Clinic

Children’s Mental Health Matters

As students in our community have settled into their back-to-school routine, we want to remind you that children and teenagers also face mental health challenges.  We need to recognize and treat the mental health of our youth just like we do their physical health.

If there is a concern that a child you know may be experiencing a mental health issue, it’s important to seek help from a doctor or mental health professional.  Treating mental health concerns early can help prevent them from developing into a more serious conditions in the future.

There are situations and behavioral issues that can signal that something serious might be happening with a child’s mental health. Here are a few common warning signs:

Know the Signs:

  • Feels very sad, hopeless, or irritable
  • Feels overly anxious or worried
  • Is scared and fearful; has frequent nightmares
  • Is excessively angry
  • Uses alcohol or drugs
  • Avoids people; wants to be alone all of the time
  • Hears voices or sees things that aren’t there
  • Can’t concentrate, sit still, or focus attention
  • Needs to wash, clean things, or perform certain rituals many times a day
  • Talks about suicide or death
  • Hurts other people or animals; or damages property
  • Has major changes in eating or sleeping habits
  • Loses interest in friends or things usually enjoyed
  • Falls behind in school or earns lower grades

Help is available for children and teens in our area.  Early identification, diagnosis and treatment are so important to helping them reach their full potential.  

If you are concerned about a child and notice they are exhibiting these signs, please consider consulting a mental health professional.  Life Management Center has programs and services available to help, call (850) 522-4485 today to learn more about our children’s services or to schedule an appointment.

Source- Mental Health America https://www.mhanational.org/

This content provides information and discussion about mental health related subjects.  The content provided and any linked material is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

The Truth About Depression

There is so much misinformation and misconception when it comes to mental health. This could be preventing people from getting the help they desperately need. This is especially true for those suffering from depression, which is one of the most common mental health disorders affecting our society today. With all the myths surrounding depression, it’s time we talk openly about this serious mental health concern.

Myth #1- It’s all in my head. I’m just sad.

FACT: MRI studies show that depression causes changes in the brain that stop it from registering pleasurable activities. Depression is very real and is a serious medical condition — and the top cause of disability in American adults. But it’s still confused with ordinary sadness.

Myth #2- All depression looks the same.

FACT: There are many different faces of depression ranging from extreme and short episodes to subtle and constant. There is no wrong way to experience it. Depression affects people of all ages, ethnicity, race, gender and income levels. Yet it can look very different for each person depending on age and other factors. Recognizing the symptoms is an important first step toward finding help.

Myth #3- Medication is the only treatment.

FACT: Medication is not the only treatment option! Antidepressants work great for some people, but you have options including talk therapy, lifestyle changes and holistic approaches.

Myth #4- I need to deal with this alone.

FACT: Reaching out for help is a sign of strength. Depression is a medical issue, not one to bear alone.

Myth #5- People impacted by depression don’t get better.

FACT: With proper treatment people with depression can and do get better!

Life Management Center is here for you if you suspect you or someone you love may be experiencing depression. It is a serious condition and it affects over 17.3 million Americans. We offer crisis intervention, psychiatric care with outstanding physicians, and counseling services. You don’t have to suffer alone. Call (850) 522-4485 today to learn more about our services and schedule an appointment.

This content provides information and discussion about mental health related subjects. The content provided and any linked material is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Prioritize Your Mental Health

For most of us, taking care of ourselves means taking care of our body by eating well, exercising, and getting enough sleep. And while all of these are important for physical health, something is missing. Mental health and wellness is more critical now than ever before.  The mind is just as vulnerable.  So many people suffer from poor mental health and taking care of our mental wellness is often overlooked when we think about getting healthy.  It’s time for that to change.  To help you start, we’ve put together a list of 10 things you can incorporate into your routine to help prioritize your mental health.

  1. Keep a Journal. Track gratitude and achievements, each day you should include 3 things you were grateful for and 3 things you were able to accomplish.  Has something been bothering you? Let it all out…on paper. Writing about upsetting experiences can reduce symptoms of depression.
  2. Spend time with friends and family. Plan a vacation or getaway. Having something to look forward to can boost your overall happiness for up to 8 weeks! If a trip isn’t an option, then plan something at home like a cookout, go to a park, or play a game. People are 12 times more likely to feel happy on days that they spend time with friends and family.
  3. Work your strengths. Do something you’re good at to build self-confidence, then tackle a tougher task.
  4. Make time for hobbies and activities that bring you joy. Spending time doing something you love is so important to your well-being. Take time to do the things that make you happy.
  5. Laugh. Hang out with a friend who makes you laugh, watch a funny movie or TV show, even check out some cute videos online.  Laughter helps reduce anxiety.
  6. Unplug and go off the grid. Leave your smart phone at home.  Disconnect from constant emails, alerts, social media and other interruptions. Spend time doing something fun with someone face-to-face instead of digitally.
  7. Practice forgiveness. Even if it’s just forgiving that person who cut you off during your morning drive. People who forgive have better mental health and report being more satisfied with their lives.
  8. Smile. It may not be the easiest thing to do, especially if you are feeling down or anxious, but smiling can help calm you down and lower your heart rate.
  9. Go for a walk outside– it could be a stroll through the park, a walk on the beach or even a quick jaunt around the parking lot at your office. Research shows that being outside can increase energy levels, reduce depression and boost well-being.
  10. Get some sunshine!  But don’t forget to apply sunscreen. Studies show exposure to the sun increases serotonin which correlates with a better mood and feelings of satisfaction and calmness.

Source- Mental Health America https://www.mhanational.org/

This content provides information and discussion about mental health related subjects.  The content provided and any linked material is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.